Testing
  • System Testing
    • Smoke, Sanity and Regression Testing: The River Analogy
      • Smoke Testing: Testing all (wide) areas related to new feature, not deeply. Determines if we should go for further testing.
      • Sanity Testing: Testing narrow areas related to new feature, deeply.
      • Regression testing: Testing all areas related to new feature, deeply.
  • smoke testing is a shallow and wide approach.
  • It comes from hardware. After you've assembled/soldered/wired everything together, you connect it to mains and turn it on.
    • If you don't see or smell smoke, test is successful.
    • If you see smoke, disconnect power. No further testing required…
  • Smoke testing originated in the hardware testing practice of turning on a new piece of hardware for the first time and considering it a success if it does not catch fire and smoke.
  • The term originates in hardware repair and has been applied to software. It's intended to be a quick test to see if the application "catches on fire" when run for the first time. As stated above it's just to make sure you don't waste a bunch of folks time by setting them loose on something that's obviously broken.
  • Mean time to failure metric
  • Defect density metric
    • number of imperfections per:
      • Lines of code
      • Function definitions
      • Lines on input screens
  • Customer problem metric
  • Customer satisfaction metric
Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License